Gannon University Hosts Third Annual Trautman Lecture

Posted: March 23, 2017

James Bailey, Ph.D., an associate professor in Duquesne University's theology department, will give the third annual Bishop Donald Trautman Lecture in Catholic Theology at Gannon University.

The lecture, titled, "Rethinking Poverty: Insights from Catholic Social Teaching," will be held from 7-8 p.m. Tuesday, March 28 in the Yehl Ballroom of the Waldron Campus Center, 124 W. Seventh St.

Bailey, a moral theologian, has devoted much of his career to understanding and developing the power of Catholicism and the response it has to poverty.

The lecture will be drawn from Bailey's book, "Rethinking Poverty: Income Assets, and the Catholic Social Justice Tradition," and will draw upon insights from Catholic Social Teaching and how it has aided in the development of new and more effective ways of alleviating poverty.

Bailey has published widely and given conference presentations that address topics such as asset building, preferential options for the poor, poverty reduction and predatory lending.

Eric Dart, a theology instructor at Gannon and organizer of the event, said, "As a former professor and author, I have yet to encounter anyone who is as well versed in Catholic Social Teaching as Dr. Bailey.

"He continues to challenge me to think more deeply and honestly about the reality of poverty and the importance of drawing upon Catholic Social Thought as a resource for engaging poverty."

Bailey received his Master of Arts in Religion degree from Yale Divinity School and his Ph.D. in theology from Boston College, and has held teaching and research positions at Boston College and the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester.

Bailey's research has focused on the area of social ethics. Bailey is currently the director of undergraduate studies in Duquesne's theology department and chair of the undergraduate curriculum committee. He is a member of the American Academy of Religion and the Catholic Theological Society of America.

The lecture is free and open to the public. Reservations are encouraged and can be made by clicking here