Collins Lecture at Gannon University to Explore Archaeology in Turkey

Posted: March 20, 2017

Turkey is a nation that regularly appears in headlines about conflict in Syria, the geopolitics of the Middle East and the rise of authoritarian governments. Yet this ancient land is also home to some of the most significant archaeological sites in the world. The tension and relationship between these two is the subject of Gannon University's annual Collins Institute Lecture to be given by Caitlin Curtis on Wednesday, March 22 at 7 p.m. in Room 219 of the Waldron Campus Center, 214 W. Seventh St.

Curtis, whose lecture is entitled "Archaeology Is Not Just About Dead People: Community Engagement in Turkey," is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Her research interests include sustainability and heritage, critical heritage studies, cultural heritage management and heritage tourism.

It was while completing research for her master's thesis, "Planning for Heritage Preservation in Western Turkey: A GIS Approach to Archaeotourism and Agricultural Policy," that she observed the problems that arose when archaeologists imposed their plans for tourism and heritage development on local communities without adequately understanding local hopes for the future.

In 2014, Curtis received a joint junior residential fellowship in Cultural Heritage Management from Koç University's Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations and the British Institute at Ankara to pursue her dissertation research in Istanbul. She was awarded further support from the American Schools of Oriental Research, the Institute for European & Mediterranean Archaeology and the University at Buffalo.

The Collins Institute Lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Suzanne Richard, Ph.D., director of the Collins Institute, at 814-871-5605. For more information about Gannon University's excavations at the Bronze Age site at Khirbat Iskandar, Jordan, click here