Elementary School Students to Tour Gannon's Archaeology Museum Gallery

Posted: November 5, 2015

A class of first and second graders from St. Peter Cathedral School will tour the Archaeology Museum Gallery at Gannon University on Friday, November 6 from 1-2 p.m.

The students will explore the working methods of archaeologists by excavating puzzle pieces from sandboxes. They will also make pottery and learn about the ways that pottery was used in everyday life in the ancient world.

The outreach program, which was facilitated by piloting the University's School of Education, introduces the elementary school students to archaeology through in-school assemblies and tours of the Gallery.

"As the only archaeology museum in the region, and with a collection of 5000-year-old materials, the Archaeology Museum Gallery at Gannon wishes to engage and excite the community about the importance of knowing and preserving cultural heritage," said Suzanne Richard, Ph.D., director of Gannon University's Collins Institute for Archaeological Research and director of the Archaeology Museum Gallery. "By touring the museum, and with hands-on activities, students at St. Peter Cathedral School will, hopefully, be inspired to learn more about the human story of the past."

The Gallery includes a collection of objects from various cultures including classical and Hellenistic Greece and an extensive collection from which includes objects from the Bronze Age site at Khirbat Iskandar in Jordan.

The Gallery is one of several cultural resources located in the new Center for Communication and the Arts, which also houses the Schuster Gallery, studios for Gannon's award-winning radio station 90.5 WERG, and offices of the Erie Chamber Orchestra. The Center for Communication and the Arts is located at W. Seventh and Peach streets.

Richard is the principal investigator and one of the co-directors of the archaeological project at Khirbat Iskandar in Jordan. Khirbat Iskandar, a settlement on the famous caravan route, the King's Highway, east of the Dead Sea in the Plains of Moab, was occupied throughout the entire Early Bronze Age (3500-2000 BCE). Richard is the first American woman to have been granted a permit by Department of Antiquities of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan to conduct archaeological work in the country.