Gannon University Celebrates National Physical Therapy Month

Posted: October 23, 2015

Gannon University is celebrating National Physical Therapy Month in recognition of the contributions made by physical therapists and physical therapist assistants.

On October 30th at 4 p.m., the physical therapy department will host the Pumpkin Derby, a fundraiser for the Gannon Community Physical Rehab Clinic. The event is a lighthearted race featuring painted, accessorized pumpkins on wheels and will be held in the parking lot of the Robert H. Morosky Academic Center, 150 W. 10th St.

The race will support efforts to acquire equipment for the clinic, which is located in the new Human Performance Lab at Gannon University's Recreation and Wellness Center, 130 W. Fourth St. At the clinic, Gannon University physical therapy faculty and students provide physical therapy services to community members who are uninsured or underinsured.

With 149 students enrolled, Gannon University's Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program is one of the largest at the University.

The graduating class of 2015 in Gannon University's Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program had a 97 percent first-time pass rate on the National Physical Therapy Licensure Examination (NPTE).

The DPT curriculum follows the pre-physical therapy track for a total of seven years with graduates completing an undergraduate degree in four years before completing three years of professional preparation.

Gannon offers a 3+3 accelerated DPT program for qualified students wishing to pursue a degree in science or sport and exercise science. A 4+3 guaranteed program is also available to qualified students. The undergraduate four-year physical therapy program prepares students for admission to any accredited physical therapy school in the country, including Gannon's Doctor of Physical Therapy program.

National Physical Therapy Month was created by the American Physical Therapy Association, a APTA each October to recognize how physical therapists and physical therapist assistants help transform society by restoring and improving motion in people's lives.