Gannon University Recognizes Faculty Accomplishments

Frank PelczarPosted: May 11, 2015

Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs Carolynn Masters, Ph.D., RN, and Gannon University President Keith Taylor, Ph.D. (right) present Frank Pelczar, Ph.D., professor of chemistry, with the 2015 Distinguished Faculty Award

Gannon University faculty members were recognized for excellence in teaching, advising, scholarship and service-learning at the University's annual Celebration of Faculty: Awards and Scholarship event on April 17 in the Yehl Ballroom of Gannon's Waldron Campus Center.

During the past Academic Year, 85 faculty members engaged in scholarship by publishing books or manuscripts, making presentations at conferences, securing external grant funding, engaging in performing arts, or writing book reviews.

Faculty accomplishments included:

  •  208 presentations. 
  •  84 publications. 
  •  78 book, manuscript or chapter reviews. 
 
The Distinguished Faculty Award was presented to Frank Pelczar, Ph.D., professor of chemistry and director of the chemical engineering program. Pelczar, who will conclude a 48-year teaching career at Gannon at the end of the Spring 2015 Semester, was nominated by his peers and selected by a vote of the Gannon University Faculty Senate.
Awards were also given to the following faculty members:
 
Student Government Association Excellence in Teaching Award
Dominic Prianti, III, instructor in philosophy 
 
Undergraduate Research Award
Matthew Heerboth, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry 
 
The Bishop Persico "Veritas In Caritate" Award
Parris Baker, Ph.D., assistant professor of social work 
 
Excellence in Undergraduate Advising Awards
Julia Mack, Ph.D., assistant professor of criminal justice (College of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences) David Smith, lecturer in risk management (College of Engineering and Business)
Catherine Mattinson, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology (Morosky College of Health Professions and Sciences) 
 
Award for Excellence in Service-Learning
Christopher Magno, Ph.D., assistant professor of criminal justice